Secret money fuels Crossroads’ pro-GOP political machine
Sixty-two percent of funds raised by two conservative groups associated with former Bush adviser Karl Rove have come from mystery donors, a new investigation from iWatch News’ Michael Beckel reveals. 
Together, American Crossroads, a super PAC, and Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies, a nonprofit, raised $123 million through the end of 2011. Of that sum, $76.8 million went to Crossroads GPS, which is a “social welfare” group organized under section 501(c)(4) of the U.S. tax code.
Like American Crossroads, Crossroads GPS can pay for advertising that attacks political opponents by name and urges viewers to vote against them. But unlike the super PAC, GPS is prohibited from making politics its “primary purpose,” according to the IRS. And as a nonprofit, Crossroads GPS is not required to publicly name its donors.
For more, read the full story on iWatch News. 

Secret money fuels Crossroads’ pro-GOP political machine

Sixty-two percent of funds raised by two conservative groups associated with former Bush adviser Karl Rove have come from mystery donors, a new investigation from iWatch News’ Michael Beckel reveals. 

Together, American Crossroads, a super PAC, and Crossroads Grassroots Policy Strategies, a nonprofit, raised $123 million through the end of 2011. Of that sum, $76.8 million went to Crossroads GPS, which is a “social welfare” group organized under section 501(c)(4) of the U.S. tax code.

Like American Crossroads, Crossroads GPS can pay for advertising that attacks political opponents by name and urges viewers to vote against them. But unlike the super PAC, GPS is prohibited from making politics its “primary purpose,” according to the IRS. And as a nonprofit, Crossroads GPS is not required to publicly name its donors.

For more, read the full story on iWatch News