Obama pushes small-dollar donors
"If we don’t step it up, we’re in trouble," the Obama campaign pleaded in a fundraising email Monday that emphasized the threat of "billionaires and super PACs" that are seeking to defeat the president.
The email message also included the graphic above that name-checked casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, who, along with his family, has donated more than $30 million to Republican super PACs so far this election cycle.
GOP-aligned super PACs and nonprofits and Republican party committees have buoyed Mitt Romney’s own presidential bid. Party committees have higher contribution limits than candidates’ campaigns and super PACs and nonprofits have no contribution limits at all.
Thanks to these higher contribution limits, Romney and his Romney Victory Fund — which benefits his campaign and several Republican party groups — has now outraised the president and his joint fundraising operation for three months in a row.
In contrast, President Barack Obama has long sought to mobilize grassroots donors.
According to campaign finance filings with the Federal Election Commission, about 60% of the money that Obama has raised has come in chucks of $200 or less. And about three-fourths of the money Obama has raised has come from people giving less than $1,000.
Romney’s campaign has only relied on donations of $200 or less for about 20 percent of its funding. And more than half of the money Romney has raised has come from people giving at least $2,000, FEC records show.
Federal law prohibits individuals from donating more than $5,000 to either Romney or Obama — that’s $2,500 a piece for their primary and general election funds.

Obama pushes small-dollar donors

"If we don’t step it up, we’re in trouble," the Obama campaign pleaded in a fundraising email Monday that emphasized the threat of "billionaires and super PACs" that are seeking to defeat the president.

The email message also included the graphic above that name-checked casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, who, along with his family, has donated more than $30 million to Republican super PACs so far this election cycle.

GOP-aligned super PACs and nonprofits and Republican party committees have buoyed Mitt Romney’s own presidential bid. Party committees have higher contribution limits than candidates’ campaigns and super PACs and nonprofits have no contribution limits at all.

Thanks to these higher contribution limits, Romney and his Romney Victory Fund — which benefits his campaign and several Republican party groups — has now outraised the president and his joint fundraising operation for three months in a row.

In contrast, President Barack Obama has long sought to mobilize grassroots donors.

According to campaign finance filings with the Federal Election Commission, about 60% of the money that Obama has raised has come in chucks of $200 or less. And about three-fourths of the money Obama has raised has come from people giving less than $1,000.

Romney’s campaign has only relied on donations of $200 or less for about 20 percent of its funding. And more than half of the money Romney has raised has come from people giving at least $2,000, FEC records show.

Federal law prohibits individuals from donating more than $5,000 to either Romney or Obama — that’s $2,500 a piece for their primary and general election funds.